Landing pages are often linked to social media, e-mail campaigns or search engine marketing campaigns in order to enhance the effectiveness of the advertisements. The general goal of a landing page is to convert site visitors into sales or leads. If the goal is to obtain a lead, the landing page will include some method for the visitor to get into contact with the company, usually a phone number, or an inquiry form. If a sale is required, the landing page will usually have a link for the visitor to click, which will then send them to a shopping cart or a checkout area. By analyzing activity generated by the linked URL, marketers can use click-through rates and conversion rate to determine the success of an advertisement.[3]
I’ve checked out a few of Russell Brunson’s content, on youtube, and he seems to really know his stuff. To be honest, at first I was skeptical and thought he could be a fraud but then I had a read of his book. It was actually really interesting and full of useful advice, also I seen that he’s speaking at Grant Cardone’s 10X seminar (or something like that), I know he’s legit so Russell – and his program – must be too!
Whimsical isn't usually the first word that comes to mind when you think of HR software, but Teambit's illustration-heavy landing page is exactly that. A simple, one-field form is accompanied by a delightful office full of animal characters -- all of whom are very pleased with Teambit, in case you were wondering. An animal cartoon appears beside each informational section of the landing page, keeping visitors scrolling down to learn more.
Open-ended experimentation. This approach is similar to closed-ended experimentation except that more variations will be added for testing and experimentation will not stop when a winner is found. This method is used by large corporation to dynamically improve their conversion rates and improve user experience. Landing page can also be adjusted dynamically as the experiment results change to further enhance user experience.
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