Trulia did something very similar to Bills.com with their landing page. It starts with a simple form asking for "an address" (which sounds less creepy than "your address," although that's what they mean). Below this simple form field is a bright orange button that contrasts well with the hero image behind the form, and emphasizes that the estimate will be personalized to your home.
Interesting programme and a very thorough review. I will be honest I used to drink the Russell Brunson kool-aid, when he first released the Clickfunnels Bootcamp I signed up straight away, I mean who doesn’t want to retire in 100 days? That should have been my first clue, I already told myself that I wouldn’t fall into a get rich quick schemes again but Russell was different,he came with a stellar reputation, surely he wouldn’t use deceptive marketing tactics? Wrong,the actual Bootcamp is good but the advertising for it really rubs me the wrong way know. I suppose what I am trying to say is that I reckon Funnel hacks is probably a good programme, but $997 to learn how to build sales funnels? and even then you are limited to only Clickfunnels and not something like WordPress which is flexible and used widely, even if had the budget, this is a programme I would take a pass on.
This is definitely a great investment to get when you can afford to pay for it. If not, get the Dotcom Secrets and Expert Secrets book for a starter as those cover quite a few things that is inside Funnel Hacks as well, and it is at a much lower cost as well. You’ll definitely learn a lot from those books combined with what you learn in Wealthy Affiliate.
Of course, the address itself won't be enough to estimate the value of a home. It just denotes the home's neighborhood. That's why the next page follows with more questions about the property itself, like number of beds and baths. Below, you see the copy "Tell us where to send the report" -- with a disclaimer that, by entering this information, you're agreeing to connect with a real estate agent. This is a great example of a company giving value to their visitors from the get-go, while setting visitors' expectations about what will happen as a result.

Marketing experts recommend websites remove the navigation menu and limit internal and external links on the page.[7] The form length mirrors the value of the offer[clarification needed]. They may also include a relevant image, animation or short video. These pages also tend to contain small icons (i.e. of Facebook, or Twitter) to facilitate social media sharing.
Muzzle, a mac app that silences on-screen notifications, fully embraces this show don't tell mentality on their otherwise minimal landing page. Visitors to the page are greeted with a rapid-fire onslaught of embarrassing notifications in the upper left of the screen. Not only is the animation hilarious, it also manages to compellingly convey the app's usefulness without lengthly descriptions. 

I'm not sure how the algorithm works (or if there's one at all), but while I was filling it out, I had some anxiety about not qualifying. Once I found out I did, I was excited to fill out the form, which I'm sure most people who are in debt and using this tool are. By making this offer seem more exclusive before the form appeared on the landing page, I'd bet that Bills.com increased conversions pretty significantly.
The messaging on the page reinforces the reason for their click, reducing or removing confusion and therefore increasing conversion rates. This improves overall user experience and reduces the bounce rate (individuals leaving the site without converting or navigating to another portion of the site) for the page. Good message matching can increase conversion by up to 50% in many cases.[13]
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